Museums Showoff Wakefield – LINE UP ANNOUNCED!

Hello Yorkshire! Are you ready for some top class museum-related entertainment?

We’ve lined up the creme de la creme of museum talent to reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects, and thanks to those lovely folk at the Hepworth Wakefield and The Art House we’re coming to a venue near you!

Museums Showoff, the open mic night for all those who work in and love museums, will take place at the Hepworth Wakefield on Thursday 16 April. Doors open at 7.00pm and the show starts at 7.30pm. Entry is £4, tickets will be available on the door. All the money (apart from the booking fee) will be going to a local charity. Please note this show is suitable for over 18s only.

Strutting their museum-y stuff on stage will be:

Steve Cross – your compère for the evening. He collects geeky glasses and geekier jokes.

Angela Clare – What is it like to touch Henry VIII’s armoured codpiece? How do you turn ‘a bunch of old stuff’ into something relevant, interesting and possibly life-affirming? Calderdale Museums’ collections manager will share her passion for history and objects and what it’s like to be responsible for looking after precious and unique, and sometimes boring, objects.

Merrick Burrow – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the great detective Sherlock Holmes, wrote a book in 1922 in which he made the case in favour of believing in fairies. I will talk about my work with museums in West Yorkshire to explore and illuminate this strange episode as we approach the centenary of the Cottingley Fairies photographs in 2017.

Emma King & Tracy Craggs – How to Survive in Europe. Join museum geeks and international women of mystery Emma and Tracy on a no-frills tour of the joys and pitfalls of European museum partnerships. Find out why vodka is essential for project management, when English isn’t really English and why you should always carry a clean pair of pants.

Emma Manners – Mortally wounded knights, plague ridden monks and Henry VIII have been walking the ruins at Fountains Abbey.  We will show you how scripted drama can bring places to life, untangle complicated historical narratives and help children to learn.  I will be talking to myself and wearing a variety of different hats.

Anisha Christison & Sally-Ann Burley – How the unlikely lasses at the National Coal Mining Museum created Wacky Wednesdays for under 5s. Fun, storytelling, singing, crafts all themed to match the Museum’s activity.

Imran Ali – Introducing Yarn. I’ll be talking about open access community storytelling, collaborative design and institutional archives, drawn from the AHRC-funded Pararchive research programme.

Eleanor Clayton – Breezeblocks and pot plants: how and why we reconstructed Barbara Hepworth’s 1968 exhibition designs!

Stephen Foster – I’ll be musing on museums, and giving my view on what they’re for.

Stuart Tulloch – Artisans, Mechanics, Manufactures, Inventors, Artists, Scholars, and all Workpeople, and other persons of both sexes, willing to become Exhibitors are invited at once to prepare articles for Exhibition.

 

Museums Showoff Edinburgh, Nov 25 – LINE UP ANNOUNCED

Hello Edinburgh! Are you ready for some top class museum-related entertainment?

We’ve lined up the creme de la creme of Scottish museum talent to reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects, and thanks to those lovely folk at the Scottish Museums Federation we’re coming to a venue near you!

Museums Showoff, the open mic night for all those who work in and love museums, will take place in the Ballroom at the Voodoo Rooms on Tuesday 25 NovemberDoors open at 7.00pm. Entry is free, but donations will be requested on the door for our charity of the month. We suggest a donation of £5. Please note this show is suitable for over 18s only.

Strutting their museum-y stuff on stage will be:

Steve Cross – your compère for the evening, he has an extensive collection of checked shirts.

Jason Finch  – Confessions of a Curator: a trawl through 15 years working in the sector, in England and Scotland, and some of the strange and odd situations you find found yourself, both when dealing with the public and colleagues. Names have been changed to protect the innocent (not to mention to avoid libel cases) and whilst all will be true, some incidents might be enhanced for effect.

Neil Lebeter – The Day I Broke Rule #1 of Museum Club: Don’t Set Fire to the Things. I will tell the story of the time I burned an art work, why I did it, how it felt and the consequences, which were unexpected. Watch me break out in a cold sweat as I relive the experience, complete with evidence of the actual event.

Martha Findlay & Tawona Sithole – we’ll talk about the potential challenges of curating African perspectives in relation to the David Livingstone narrative!

Lyn Cunningham & Paul Gray – Glasgow design team Suisse will talk you through their experiences in realising their brief to reinterpret The Scottish Maritime Museum in Irvine.

Graeme Hawley – The Joy of Spines.  Graeme Hawley makes you sit up straight with a tour amongst the book stacks.

Christine McLean – I’ll share with you our terrifying experience of a zombie virus spreading through the National Museum of Scotland, turning staff and some visitors in to flesh-eating monsters.

Ralph Moffat – Animal, vegetable, or mineral, it’ll do anything to anything! Glasgow Museums has weapons for war, hunting, and just plain showing off (jousting and tournaments). This short PowerPoint formatted slideshow will have (non-moving) images of this amazing collection.

Susan Morrison – Susan Morrison belongs in a museum, since she is a 55 year old comic, in relatively good condition and only slightly foxed around the edges. An equivalent copy of the Beano or Dandy would fetch a good price in an auction, which means she should fetch a decent price. She’s not telling what she’s doing- you have to be there!

Henrietta Lidchi – Is seeing believing? Tales from museums and fieldwork, at the British Museum and beyond.

Pam Barnes – Staging the Museum: a short talk on the use of performance to build on community engagement.

Museums Showoff Manchester 2, May 29 – LINE-UP ANNOUNCED

Hello Manchester! Are you ready for some top class museum-related entertainment? We’ve lined up the creme de la creme of Manucian museum talent to reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects, and thanks to those lovely folk at the Institute of Cultural Practices we’re coming to a venue near you!

Museums Showoff, the open mic night for all those who work in and love museums, will take place in the Engine Hall at the People’s History Museum on Thursday 29 May. Doors open at 6.30pm. Entry is free, but donations will be requested on the door for our charity of the month. We suggest a donation of £5. Please note this show is suitable for over 18s only.

Taking to the stage for this extravaganza of wit and wisdom, objects and exhibitions are:

Steve Cross – your bespectacled compère and wearer of nerdy t shirts. He will tell jokes, muck about and try to keep things to time.

Catherine Robins – In June, Unlocking Ideas Worth Fighting For – a joint project between the People’s History Museum and Working Class Movement Library – will host a 24-hour hackathon. What, why and how are all questions we’ve been grappling with. As the event deadline looms I will be talking about the event to come and about finally having the answers to those questions. Well, *hopefully* having the answers – don’t want to jinx it.

Charlie Battersby – Fuzzy Duck are a creative agency who approach our work with museums and galleries like wide eyed and wondrous children, with curiosity, joy and daring. I’ll be talking about a recently completed project with the Manchester United Museum from the perspective of both a designer and mildly obsessive, impressionable and ultimately proud, life long United fan.

Irving Czechowicz – I’ll tell you about the unique  story of Maharaja the Asian Elephant who walked from Scotland to Manchester and ended up on the first floor of the Manchester Museum.

Jennifer Reid – Local singer Jennifer Reid will discuss and perform working class songs from Chetham’s Library’s nineteenth-century broadside ballad collection.

Angela Whitecross & Jennifer Mabbott – ReCycle Rochdale is a collaborative art project between Rochdale Pioneers Museum, artist Richard Dawson and a youth group in Rochdale exploring co-operatives and cycling, which will to mark the Tour De France passing through the borough. This result is a co-operative kinetic bike art sculpture, which will be part of our ‘Journey into Co-operative Cycling’ exhibition. This set will document the truly co-operative nature of this exciting project and showcase the final creation!

Alison Atkin – Out of Sight. How being alone in a room filled with brains at MOSI, severely craving the effects of caffeine, and one off-hand tweet resulted in a series of short stories.

Ingrid Francis – I’ll divulge some of the opinions I heard during my recent research into museums’ use of social media to encourage visitors to engage with collections.

 

Museums Showoff Bristol, 20 March – LINE-UP ANNOUNCED

Hello South West England! Are you ready for some top class museum-related entertainment?

We’ve lined up the creme de la creme of the south-west’s museum talent to reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects. Thanks to those ace people at SW Museums Development Programme we’re coming to a venue near you.

Museums Showoff, the cabaret-style night for all those who work in and love museum, will be at The Grain Barge, Bristol BS8 on Thursday 20 March 2014, Doors open at 7.00pm. Entry is free, but we will be collecting donations on the door for Off the Record, who offer counselling & support to people under 25. We suggest a donation of £5.

Taking to the stage for this extravaganza of wit and wisdom, objects and exhibitions will be:

Steve Cross – your compère for the evening: telling jokes, introducing acts and keeping things to time.

Laura Hilton – Laura Hilton is currently turning a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund into a shiny new Visitor Centre for the 150th anniversary of the Clifton Suspension Bridge. To avoid doing any additional  work, she is using this research to bring you tales of daring (or derring) do and desperation from the archives – with a bit of mythbusting, a world champion who was terrible at hide and seek, and a surprising amount about turnips

Nancy Heath – I’ll be taking an amusing and quirky look at the stories of scandal and bad behaviour of the St John family of Lydiard House. William Shakespeare said that “men’s vows are women’s traitors” and you’ll hear that the St John men were traitors indeed with our tale of mistresses, divorces and illegitimate heirs.

Richard Jaeschke – Busting the myth: how (almost) everything you know about conservation is wrong, what conservators really get up to and why you need to know!

Team SSGB – The many faces of Brunel: amid a sea of assumptions and misconceptions the SS Great Britain team set sail on a voyage of discovery to find the ‘real’ Brunel. Expect ‘riveting’ content!

Liz Neathey – It’s time for museums to take control to achieve sustainable futures. Find out about an innovative programme being delivered through South West Museum Development.

Janine Marriott – Life, death, murder, medicine and madness. All featuring in a whistle stop tour of creepy tales, burrowing badgers, crying kids and family fun at Arnos Vale with Janine Marriott, learning coordinator.

Mark Small – Red Lodge? What’s that? Where is it? Is it open? I didn’t know Bristol had a knot garden! Or an Elizabethan oak-panelled room! A brief introduction to the Red Lodge – who we are, where we are, what we are, and what we want to be in future.

Zak Mensah – Why open practices make Bristol Museums, Galleries and Archives better. I think sharing is caring, so I’ll be talking about why I care so much about sharing what we do with digital technology across the service and in public.

Rebecca Clay – Do you remember when ACE told us we should recruit young, trendy ‘Arts Ambassadors’ to attend events unpaid, on behalf of our organisation, and we all laughed? Well they didn’t get it all wrong. I will be looking at the how to get the best out of the people who act as ambassadors for your organisation.

Anna Farthing – Kiss: A Story of Life and Death. Share a disturbing discovery from the Thackray Museum’s ‘Magic of Medicine’ exhibition and hear about the UK Medical Collections Group’s current ACE funded project, ‘From the Medicine Cabinet’.

Museums Showoff Cambridge – LINE-UP ANNOUNCED

Hello Cambridge! Are you ready for some top class museum-related entertainment? We’ve lined up some top class museum talent to reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects. Thanks to Cambridge University Museums, we’re coming to a venue near you!

Museums Showoff, the open mic night for all those who work in and love museums, will be at J3 at Cambridge Junction, Clifton Way, CB1 7GX on Wednesday 30th October. The show starts at 8pm, and the bar will be open beforehand. Entry is free, but we will be collecting on the door for Rowan, which brings artists and people with learning disabilities together in the production of fine artwork and crafts. We suggest a donation of £5.

Taking to the stage for this extravaganza of wit and wisdom, objects and exhibitions are:

Steve Cross – your compère for the night, he critiques museums through the medium of t-shirts.

Matt Lowe & Roz Wade – Four Million Specimens and 12 months. From a Finback Whale to Darwin’s Beetles, find out how the University Museum of Zoology is packing its collections in time for a once in a generation redevelopment!

Josh Newman – Bringing a dull Regency Room to life. Nelson and his boss and mentor Earl St Vincent had dinner at Torre Abbey in 1801. They were friendly on the surface but underneath the resentment seethed. I’ll describe how an unusual digital display illustrates the anger, frustration and overbearing politeness.

Rosie Amos – Polar Museum Educator Rosie Amos will be talking about how to make concept-heavy subjects like climate change ‘hands-on’ in a museum environment, including; blindfolds, dancing beluga whales and a climate change sing-along!.

Dan Pemberton – The Collection of Dr John Woodward comprises about 9,400 rocks, minerals, fossils and archaeological artefacts still kept in their original early 18th century collectors cabinets. I will show images of my favourite objects and tell some of the stories behind them and  the people who contributed to Woodward’s collection.

Anna Mikhaylova – Museums in Russia… it sounds like something about “the Hermitage” and “Pushkin”. However, not! There are more that 2500 museums, and I’ll tell you some myths, facts and legends.

Matt Smith – I’ll be talking about a piece of World War 2 body armour issued to American Air Force Bomber Crews in Europe. What it was supposed to do, how it was supposed to do it; how the crews really used it and why as an explainer at the Imperial War Museum, Duxford, this makes a great object to work with and seems to fascinate the young and old!

Helen Weinstein – Museum collections beyond the museum walls. I will showcase a walking trails project to bring museum objects to the public by partnering museum curators and volunteers, university researchers and students, to produce history trail apps.

Alec Morrison – I’ll be showing off about the project I created with volunteers at The Cromwell Museum in Huntingdon to create an exhibition about a map, one of the first in this country, of Huntingdon town centre drawn in 1607 when Oliver Cromwell was still a boy living there. We surveyed the town centre using the same mapping techniques that would have been used to draw the original map

Liz Davies & Jessica van Bussel – Who needs small independent Museums? A brief, but spirited, exchange of views revealing some little known facts about St Neots from miracles to murder.

 


Museums Showoff Norwich – LINE UP ANNOUNCED

Hello Norwich! Are you ready for some top class museum-related entertainment? We’ve lined up the best of Norfolk’s museum talent to reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects. Thanks to Museums Norfolk, we’re coming to a venue near you!

Museums Showoff, the open mic night for all those who work in and love museums, will take place at OPEN Club, 28 Castle Meadow, Norwich NR1 3DS on Thursday 13 June. Doors open at 6.30pm. Book a free ticket via the Eventbrite page. Donations will be requested on the door for OPEN Youth Trust which runs projects to support the education, training and wellbeing of people under 25. We suggest a donation of £5.

Taking to the stage for this extravaganza of wit and wisdom, objects and exhibitions are:

Steve Cross – your compère for the night, he critiques museums through the medium of t-shirts.

Basil Abbott – I will describe how commemorating famous people has paid dividends for Diss Museum and won a string of awards.

Laura Drysdale – Living With Me LIVE: tales of Fred the Head, Barbie and Bertha and sweeping angels’ wings. Women at play with the Sainsbury Centre’s collection.

Sophie Cabot and Christian Charmley – Sit yourself down and treat yourself to ‘How do I Heritage?’: the existential chaos of two ex-archaeologists thrust into a world of desks, corded telephones and central heating. We’ll introduce you to the exciting world of heritage asset management and outreach, regaling you with tales of homicidal schoolchildren, funding battles and the quest to make Heritage Open Days appeal to absolutely everybody in the world ever.

Jamie Everitt – Lord Gnome’s guide to funding applications: I’ll be taking a humorous look at applying for funding with the aid of the enigmatic owner of Private Eye magazine, Lord Gnome. Warning! Contains genuine advice.

Emma Brough & Fiona Ford – The French Connection! Emma Brough and Fiona Ford will show you how NMAS projects are revealing Norfolk’s Norman heritage.

Ruth Battersby Tooke – I will be reading an embroidered letter from the Workhouse and reflecting on the use of textiles as a therapy.

Chris Morshead – Museums – a home for social drifters? I will take a look at how museums can be focal points for groups of people and form “family communities” for different types of people who come in search of their past lives.

Lorna Richardson – A Rummage Through Our Drawers: The University of Cambridge Museum of Zoology will be closing in June for two years for refurbishment. How can we keep you interested in our collections while we are closed, and what kind of objects would you like to see most? I will present a a semi-show-and-tell, looking at some of the objects from the handling collection, how the Museum website currently works and getting audience opinion on what bits of our drawers they’d like to fumble around in?!

Andy Bennett – Former museum interpreter and now a full time poet, Andy will perform extracts from his epic poem about the history of Norwich Castle, Donjon.

Marion Catlin and Roxanne Matthews – We’ll be talking about the idea that a city can be viewed as a public museum, curated by its residents and interpreted through local knowledge. We will look at ways of interpreting some of the lesser known stories that every place has, particularly using digital interventions.

 

Museums Showoff Manchester, 28 Feb – LINE UP ANNOUNCED

Hello Manchester! Are you ready for some top class museum-related entertainment? We’ve lined up the creme de la creme of Manucian museum talent to reveal behind-the-scenes stories, intriguing insights and amazing projects.

Museums Showoff, the open mic night for all those who work in and love museums, will take place in the cafe at Manchester Art Gallery on Thursday 28 February. Doors open at 6.30pm. Book a free ticket via the Eventbrite page. Donations will be requested on the door for 42nd Street, who support the emotional wellbeing of children and young people. We suggest a donation of £5.

Taking to the stage for this extravaganza of wit and wisdom, objects and exhibitions are:

Steve Cross – compère and joke teller, Steve likes nothing more than to poke fun at the Science Museum.

David Carden – I sing banjo and ukulele songs inspired by the 18th and 19th century collections at Manchester Art Gallery.

Campbell Price – Mummies and Magic. Arguably, Manchester Museum’s most popular attraction is its Egyptian collection – but why do mummies repel us and intrigue us in equal measure? Egyptology curator Campbell Price recounts tales of the weird and the wonderful.

Jeni McConnell – I’d like to tell you about a group of enthusiastic young people who put together an intriguing evening guided walk with performances that connected objects and stories from Warrington Museum with the histories of the local streets. Their performances and readings captured their audience, linking local places and people and giving a unique view of a familiar place as they launched themselves into The Bright Unknown.

Gemma Angel – What connects 19th century tattooing, mercury and syphilis? I will explore some surprising links between geology, history of medicine and art through my doctoral work on the Wellcome’s collection of 300 preserved tattooed human skins at the Science Museum.

David Steele – I will be doing a stand-up comedy presentation on the subject of museums and the people that go to them.

Paul Cookson – I will do a selection of interactive performance poetry, based on my work at the National Football Museum. Audience participation is non negotiable!

Catherine O’Donnell – Catherine will be performing a taster of the Little People’s History Museum story Mr Ordinary’s Prize. Join in the adventure and get involved in the puppetry fun!

Helen Rees Leahy – Why Museums Make you Ill…The contemporary orthodoxy that links museums with happiness and well-being in its various guises overlooks an inconvenient historical truth: museums (can) make you ill. This talk recuperates the forgotten history of museum sickness, so that the next time you feel develop an ‘aesthetic headache’ or feel nauseous after an afternoon in a gallery, you’ll know that you’re in good company.

Stephen Howe, James Eagleton and Lee Wolstenholme – We are MOSI’s Singing Scientists. We play John Dalton, who developed Atomic theory into a science, Sir Bernard Lovell, famous for his work radio astronomy and the development of Jodrell Bank telescope and William Perkin, who, whilst trying to crack the chemical code of artificial Quinine from coal tar, happened across a way to create cheaper dyes. Three part harmony acapella singing from this trio tells the story of these great scientists’ achievements.

Ann French – You may think that there is only one way to display a textile, but conservators know different – especially when you’ve got to appease a curator! I’ll be musing on the ways I’ve created textile display systems to express a curator’s exhibition ideas.